Site Map

Asthma in adults - what to ask the doctor

What to ask your doctor about asthma - adult

Asthma is a problem with the lung airways. A person with asthma may not feel symptoms all the time. But when an asthma attack happens, it becomes hard for air to pass through your airways. The symptoms are usually:

In rare cases, asthma causes chest pain.

Below are some questions you may want to ask your health care provider to help you take care of your asthma.

I Would Like to Learn About:

Questions

Am I taking my asthma medicines the right way?

What are some signs that my asthma is getting worse and that I need to call the doctor? What should I do when I feel short of breath?

What shots or vaccinations do I need?

What will make my asthma worse?

What sort of changes should I make around my home?

What sort of changes do I need to make at work?

What exercises are better for me to do?

Do I need tests or treatments for allergies? What should I do when I know I am going to be around something that triggers my asthma?

What type of planning do I need to do before I travel?

Related Information

Asthma
Asthma and allergy resources
Asthma - control drugs
Asthma - quick-relief drugs
Exercise-induced asthma
How to use an inhaler - no spacer
How to use an inhaler - with spacer
How to use your peak flow meter
Make peak flow a habit
Signs of an asthma attack
Stay away from asthma triggers

References

Centers for Disease Control and Prevention website. Asthma. www.cdc.gov/asthma/default.htm. Updated April 24, 2018. Accessed November 20, 2018.

Lugogo N, Que LG, Gilstrap DL, Kraft M. Asthma: clinical diagnosis and management. In: Broaddus VC, Mason RJ, Ernst JD, et al, eds. Murray and Nadel's Textbook of Respiratory Medicine. 6th ed. Philadelphia, PA: Elsevier Saunders; 2016:chap 42.

National Heart, Lung, and Blood Institute website. Guidelines for the diagnosis and management of asthma (EPR-3). www.nhlbi.nih.gov/guidelines/asthma/asthgdln.htm. Updated August 2007. Accessed November 20, 2018.

BACK TO TOP

Review Date: 11/3/2018  

Reviewed By: Denis Hadjiliadis, MD, MHS, Paul F. Harron Jr. Associate Professor of Medicine, Pulmonary, Allergy, and Critical Care, Perelman School of Medicine, University of Pennsylvania, Philadelphia, PA. Also reviewed by David Zieve, MD, MHA, Medical Director, Brenda Conaway, Editorial Director, and the A.D.A.M. Editorial team.

ADAM Quality Logo

A.D.A.M., Inc. is accredited by URAC, for Health Content Provider (www.urac.org). URAC's accreditation program is an independent audit to verify that A.D.A.M. follows rigorous standards of quality and accountability. A.D.A.M. is among the first to achieve this important distinction for online health information and services. Learn more about A.D.A.M.'s editorial policy, editorial process and privacy policy. A.D.A.M. is also a founding member of Hi-Ethics. This site complies with the HONcode standard for trustworthy health information: verify here.

The information provided herein should not be used during any medical emergency or for the diagnosis or treatment of any medical condition. A licensed medical professional should be consulted for diagnosis and treatment of any and all medical conditions. Links to other sites are provided for information only -- they do not constitute endorsements of those other sites. © 1997- 2019 A.D.A.M., a business unit of Ebix, Inc. Any duplication or distribution of the information contained herein is strictly prohibited.

A.D.A.M. content is best viewed in IE9 or above, Firefox and Google Chrome browser.