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Nausea and acupressure

Acupressure and nausea

Information

Acupressure is an ancient Chinese method that involves placing pressure on an area of your body, using fingers or another device, to make you feel better. It is similar to acupuncture. Acupressure and acupuncture work by changing the pain messages that nerves send to your brain.

Sometimes, mild nausea and even morning sickness may improve by using your middle and index fingers to press firmly down on the groove between the two large tendons on the inside of your wrist that start at the base of your palm.

Special wristbands to help relieve nausea are sold over the counter at many stores. When the band is worn around the wrist, it presses on these pressure points.

Acupuncture is often used for nausea or vomiting related to chemotherapy for cancer.

References

Hass DJ. Complementary and alternative medicine. In: Feldman M, Friedman LS, Brandt LJ, eds. Sleisenger and Fordtran's Gastrointestinal and Liver Disease: Pathophysiology/Diagnosis/Management. 10th ed. Philadelphia, PA: Elsevier Saunders; 2016:chap 131.

Michelfelder AJ. Acupuncture for nausea and vomiting. In: Rakel D, ed. Integrative Medicine. 4th ed. Philadelphia, PA: Elsevier; 2018:chap 111.

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  • Nausea acupressure - illustration

    Mild nausea may be relieved by pressing down hard, with a thumb or finger, on the groove between the two large tendons that run from the base of the palm up to the elbow.

    Nausea acupressure

    illustration

  • Nausea acupressure - illustration

    Mild nausea may be relieved by pressing down hard, with a thumb or finger, on the groove between the two large tendons that run from the base of the palm up to the elbow.

    Nausea acupressure

    illustration

 

Review Date: 9/24/2017

Reviewed By: Linda J. Vorvick, MD, Clinical Associate Professor, Department of Family Medicine, UW Medicine, School of Medicine, University of Washington, Seattle, WA. Also reviewed by David Zieve, MD, MHA, Medical Director, Brenda Conaway, Editorial Director, and the A.D.A.M. Editorial team.

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